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Found 277 results

  1. Hi guys! Here is a new video that I did recently. Happy to be able to share it! I would be glad if you watch it and even more glad if you let me know what you think about it! Hope someone will like it and also hope that someone will give me usefull critic. Also did a Behance project of the video. I'll be glad if you take a look at this too!
  2. I have 2 Alexa Mini packages 1st Camera Alexa Mini Asking $44,000.00 Hours 1826 Comes with ALEXA Mini 4:3 License Key ALEXA Mini ARRIRAW License Key ARRI Look Library License Key Mini Viewfinder MVF-1 k2.0005861 Viewfinder Extension Bracket Arri K2.74000.0-VEB3 Mini Side Bracket MSB-1 k2.0006348 MSB-1 Arri Center Camera Handle k2.73002.1-cch-2 Arri Mini adptr plate k2.0006347 Arri Mini Side Bracket MSB-1 k2.0006348 Arri CSP-1 Shoulder Pad k2.0006807 Arri BPA-4 Bridge Plate k2.0006352 Wooden Camera A-box 5-Cards 2nd pkg. Alexa Mini Asking $46,000.00 Arri Mini VF k2.0005861 Hours 1195 Comes with Arri Viewfinder Extension Bracket 2-Arri Mini Adapter Plate MP-1 2-K2.0006334 Arri Center Camera Handle k2.73002-CCH-2 Arri Mini Side Bracket MSB-1 k2.0006348 Arri MAP 2Adapter Plate with Rod Support k2.0006347 Wooden Camera Bebop ALEXA Mini 4:3 License Key ALEXA Mini ARRIRAW License Key ARRI Look Library License Key
  3. WARNING: MATURE CONTENT. Speed Date is a black comedy about Jack and Natalie who approach their allocated time together with different mindsets. What could go wrong? [Best with Headphones] Shot on a Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera + Sigma 18-35mm Lens.
  4. Hello everyone! I would love to get some opinions on the following. Let’s say you’re shooting a narrative, a 10 page dialogue scene over the course of 2 days. This scene takes place in one location, with blocking all in one vicinity. Would you rather A) Shoot 5 pages/day, jumping around to all of your camera/light setups for those 5, or B) Shoot 10 pages/day, shooting out half of your setups like wide, two shot, etc. Theres interesting pros and cons to both; as a DP I jump for the 10 page idea so I can be efficient with setups and time, yet a director might see benefit performance And continuity wise for the 5 page option. Worked on a feature recently where this problem arose, and would love to hear everyone’s opinions and logic.
  5. Hi friends Can you suggest me a subject for thesis about cinematography and television? thank you
  6. Hi people, Would very much appreciate if anyone could shed some light on how this shot was achieved (in production and in post production). I can see its on a periscope camera lens for this shot, but is this just because they are shooting on a large film camera? Could this be achieved without the periscope if say using an alexa mini? If so what type of lens is ideal for this? And I assume the point of view digital tunnel is added in post with rotoscoping around the interior of the goggles first before coming in to full screen. If this is indeed the case can anyone tell me what they are raising in front of the actors face as the camera turns in the second picture? Thanks so much. Please find the clip from the movie (Timecode 00:25-00:32)... Also please find the link to the video showing the BTS (Timecode 00:42-00:45)...
  7. Having recently played games on the PS4 like Death Stranding and Detroit: Become Human that seem to rely heavily on the seamlessness between the in game cinematics and gameplay, I’m curious of the overall feeling toward video game cinematography and how the community feels about it’s future. I remember seeing an article in American Cinematographer about Detroit: Become Human, which first piqued my interest in the medium. Is this type of cinematography other DPs are keeping their eye on? Also, if anyone knows of any resources that are available for someone like me who is interested in the medium but comes from a traditional cinematography background; it would be greatly appreciated if you could point me in the right direction. Thanks, RC
  8. Has anyone here shot IR with the Panasonic EVA1? I own an EVA and someone asked me about it, I’ve never had a reason to shoot with this feature but I’m curious as to what situations it would be useful. Or is it something that allows for more creative options.
  9. Hi guys, I'm a data manager and a digital imaging technician student. I'm looking for books about dit since a long time. I found these two on internet: Imaging processing for cinema - Marcelo Bertalmìo https://www.amazon.it/dp/1439899274/?coliid=I1MCJA8LDTC8HY&colid=2K966BF7HDL56&psc=1&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it The Filmmaker’s Guide to Digital Imaging: for Cinematographers, Digital Imaging Technicians, and Camera Assistants https://www.amazon.it/dp/0415854113/?coliid=I2JPL1XV8KFXW5&colid=2K966BF7HDL56&psc=1&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it Anyone knows something about these books ? Really appreciated any advise about other books.
  10. Hey everyone, I've been looking for a solid, hands-on introductory class for a while now and I'm looking for some advice, recommendations, tips, things to look (out) for. The program should give me a foundation on which I can build for the coming years. I want to learn the tools and craft, not how to use a particular camera. I've found three solid options so far, and they are: 1- Maine Media Workshops (Maine, USA): 10 week intensive cinematography workshop. PROS: Asked around and this program is definitely solid with some world class instructors. CONS: Extremely expensive. (16k) 2- Global Institute (LA, USA): The foundational programs. PROS: World class program and instructors, located in L.A. CONS: Asked a friend, apparently even the foundational programs are a bit too advanced for someone who's never worked in the camera department. Pretty expensive (expensive at about 10k for a bunch of classes). 3- Afilms (Barcelona, Spain): 3 month Feature Film Cinematography. PROS: Solid program, but not as good as the other two though significantly cheaper. CONS: Starts in a year, that's in quite a long time. I feel like doing this in a couple of months. I don't mind studying anywhere in the world, as long as I can justify it to myself. The class should be technical. I've been curating and improving my eyes for a while now and I'm pretty familiar with filmmaking at many levels, but I want to demystify light (or at least start the process), as I feel it will benefit me greatly as a director. I also feel like shaping light, so being able to DP my own little projects, explore studio photography etc. is something I'm interested in. I'm not under the illusion that I will become a DP after this workshop, I just want to be able to think like one at a basic level, so I can improve myself in the future. Director's showreel if anyone's curious. Thanks in advance.
  11. Hello all, I’d like to get the word out about my book, which is coming out this month. I have been teaching lighting at Fairleigh Dickinson University for the past 12 years and while there are some excellent books on cinematography out there, such as Film Lighting and Reflections, I never found one on lighting that was directed towards film students and cinematographers who were lighting with limited resources. My students found those books inspiring but not immediately applicable to what they were doing on the films they were shooting. I started as an AC, then become a best boy, gaffer, video LD and indie cinematographer and worked on so many different kinds of productions with so many different budgets that I was able to developed a course that was a good foundation for young cinematographers to help guide and inspire them to do creative lighting on a budget. Two of my students have gone on to be accepted into the AFI cinematography program while other students of mine are now working as electrics, gaffers, ACs, camera operators and one is a great steadi-cam op. At a film teachers convention I was approached by an editor from Bloomsbury Press and asked if I would write my class into a craft book that could be used by other colleges and budding DPs. I said I would if she promised they could keep the price down to under $30 – as I know how expensive textbooks can be and how few students will actually buy the expensive ones. While this means I would get a tiny royalty, I didn’t really care, because I wasn’t doing it for money – but rather as a way to give back. I learned so much from so many, it is our obligation to pass on the art and craft that we learned and love. She agreed. The result is "Lighting for Cinematography: a practical guide to the art and craft of lighting for the moving image", now available from Bloomsbury Press and Amazon. Lighting for Cinematography, the first volume in the new CineTech Guides to the Film Crafts. Broken down into 14 chapters with exercises at the end of each, the book is designed to help the reader create lighting that supports the emotional moment of the scene and contributes to the atmosphere of the story. Chapters cover such things as lighting for movement, working with windows, night lighting, lighting the three plains of action and non-fiction lighting and include stills and lighting diagrams from indie budget productions. also my website www.lightingforcinematography.com
  12. I recently came across a well known DP's story on Instagram in which it was seen two cameras were stacked on top of each other. It was noticable that both the cameras had different magnifications (different lenses). I can't help but wonder why he might have done this given that these cams shoot 4k/6k or so, he might as well have just cropped in as required. Would be great if someone with experience could explain why this is done. I have attached a screenshot for reference.
  13. Interview with CATHERINE LUTES CSC: CINEMATOGRAPHER LIFESTYLE https://anchor.fm/cinematographer.lifestyle Apple: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/id1457497882 Android: https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9hbmNob3IuZm0vcy85ZGYwM2EwL3BvZGNhc3QvcnNz Spotify: If you enjoy this podcast, please share. Not for profit, if it gets enough views, I'll keep it going. Cheers ♥ 🙏 Justin Lovell Associate Member of the Canadian Society of Cinematographers
  14. Hello guys, I have a very stupid question, haha. I will have a interview shoot next week, and it will be my first time working with projector. So I have some question regarding working with projector, fist of all, would I be able to use projector as my KEY light? Second of all, what should I be aware of working with projector? (I am worry about the flicker) Third of all, I do not know if I could use projector as my FILL light and have my own lighting unit play as KEY light? Guys please share with me some of your experience working with projector!! Thank you so much for taking time read my stupid questions, really need some help!
  15. Hello everybody. I just got my chance do a music video for an accomplish singer. I will be the cinematographer. There are two shots the director wants to get. Fortune cookie is the main element in the video and the story. The director wants to see the shore line filled with fortune cookies as the waves are bringing them to the beach. As an alternative we can use a mountain of fortune cookies at the beach. Since we don't have permit to shoot at the beach and throwing the fortune cookies in the ocean is not possible I am trying to find a way to achieve this by using practical effects. The biggest problem is that we need to shoot it this coming Tuesday. Not much time. I already rented a Laowa 24mm macro probe lens to get some of the shots we need. I was thinking of using this lens and forced perspective to get the effect of mountain of cookies. I am thinking of using a table covered with the same sand from the beach we will shoot. Then make a mountain of cookies on the table. By placing the singer in a distance place I am hoping I can get that shot. It would be better if we had smaller scale of fortune cookies but in this case it will look like a mountain of giant cookies. I am assuming that I can get this shot. How would I achieve the cookies hitting on the shoreline by the waves? The director herself will edit the video and I don't think she can do it in post. I can help her maybe if I can get some advice on how to shoot it. I was guessing that maybe we can do something with greenscreen. Maybe have them swim in a small pool in front of a green screen and some sand. I don't know. If anyone has idea please share it. I would really appreciate it. Thanks in advance.
  16. I'm relatively new to drone (18 months) but have found that once you have learned the controls it simply becomes another "tool in the box", another way of placing your lens in different or unusual places. I have a passion for landscape and enjoy trying to tweak the HLG (HDR) format to its full potential. Still learning but enjoying the ride. https://vimeo.com/335046212
  17. Panavision, the world-class provider of end-to-end solutions, will return to Cine Gear Expo (May 31-June 1) at The Studios at Paramount to showcase the latest innovations in the company’s ever-expanding production and post production ecosystem. Panavision, Light Iron and LEE Filters will display an array of integrated technologies and systems at booth S408 on Stage 3 – ranging from lenses, cameras and filters, to state-of-the-art production and post production workflows – that illustrate Panavision’s commitment to providing the most versatile and powerful storytelling tools. “At Panavision, our vision is to support filmmakers with solutions that expand creativity and efficiency,” says Kim Snyder, president and CEO of Panavision. “We’re always focused on adapting the tremendous power of technology to the needs of the visual artist. We’re proud and excited to demonstrate our latest advancements.” Among the breakthroughs on display are Panavision and Light Iron’s new LINK HDR system. Creatives are producing for HDR-capable distribution platforms more than ever before as consumers seek premium viewing experiences. LINK HDR was developed to address the challenge of viewing HDR (high dynamic range) images throughout the production and post production process. Offering HDR and SDR viewing options in tandem, LINK HDR provides cinematographers, directors, editors and creative talent throughout the imaging chain the ability to view their image at the same quality delivered to consumers. The LINK HDR system consists of: Panavision LINK HDR On-Set Cart – a modular cart outfitted with various monitoring configurations that offers creatives the ability to view HDR and SDR live from the camera. Light Iron LINK HDR Dailies – an NLE process that creates HDR and SDR deliverables simultaneously, which allows editors to cut, toggle between, and export in either format. Light Iron LINK HDR Finish – a combination of creative talent, technical expertise, and leading technologies that link the creative decisions made on-set to the HDR mastering process for delivery to various HDR platforms. “As adoption rates of the HDR format rapidly grow, it is more critical than ever for creatives to view a consistent image from on-set through the finishing suite,” notes Light Iron Supervising Colorist Ian Vertovec. “We want filmmakers to have all the tools they need for this new deliverable. The components of LINK HDR were designed with them in mind.” Panavision’s Millennium DXL2 and DXL-M camera systems will also be showcased at the Panavision booth, demonstrating the value of this expanding ecosystem. With new industry developments, the DXL2’s 6G 4K SDI outputs, which allow direct connection to a Teradek Bolt 4K with a single SDI cable, can now be fully utilized. The latest enhancements to the DXL2 also include: an integrated C-Motion F.I.Z. module allowing the use of Arri WCU4 wireless lens control handsets with full lens mapping support; a proxy workflow that allows easy creation of traditional dailies while archiving 8K files for DI and VFX; a wireless audio module adding expanded audio capabilities; and DXL Control for iPhone and Android. The DXL-M, which marries the modularity and connectivity of the DXL with the smaller size and weight of RED’s DSMC2 cameras, is now available to filmmakers. In addition to the Primo HDR viewfinder, DXL menu system and LiColor2, the DXL-M now offers 2x2 SDI outputs delivering two independent monitoring paths across 4x HD-SDI outputs. Along with added accessories, battery elevator and control upgrades, these advancements add to the efficiency and flexibility of the kit. The result is a fully-equipped camera that is conveniently adaptable to any shooting scenario, including drone, remote head shots and situations where space is at a premium. Panavision’s LCND, a variable liquid crystal neutral density filtration system, will be presented with expanded new features. LCND is now wirelessly controllable via the Preston handset and offers functionality that translates to creativity on the set. The ability to maintain a given stop under changing lighting conditions by riding the ND filter instead of the iris adds powerful image control options at the moment of photography. LCND also has manual controls and a 24-hour internal battery built into the single filter tray. Panavision’s longstanding emphasis on delivering superior lens quality and unmatched selection continues to be a priority as it serves the artistic needs of today’s creative community. At Cine Gear, filmmakers can examine the company’s proprietary portfolio of optics, including the Primo-X (weatherproof and compact drone and gimbal solution), Panaspeed (large format, high-speed T1.4 with the classic Primo look), H-Series (vintage portrait look for spherical large format), and UltraVista (1.65x large-format anamorphic) lines, as well as other lenses in Panavision’s large-format offerings. In addition to exhibiting, Panavision, in partnership with RED Digital Cinema, will present a panel featuring Oscar®-nominated cinematographer John Schwartzman, ASC. Panavision’s SVP of Optics Dan Sasaki will join Schwartzman as he discusses his approach to visual storytelling and explores the fusion between visual concepts and tools. Schwartzman will reveal his decision-making process from pre-production to post on such projects as The Highwaymen and the upcoming Last Christmas, on June 1 at 11:45 a.m. in the Sherry Lansing Theater. LEE Filters will highlight the LEE100, a newly updated 100mm filter mount system that boasts lighter weight and improved performance. The LEE100 Filter System incorporates a rotation lock as well as a newly designed clip-on polarizer filter for ease of use. Additionally, LEE’s full collection of lighting gels, including the expanded range of Zircon gels specifically designed for fine-tuning LED fixtures, will be touted, as well as the ProGlass CINE IRND range of neutral-density filters, precisely built to meet the exacting needs of cinematographers. “The advancements on display at Cine Gear exemplify our commitment to providing end-to-end solutions that put creative flexibility in the hands of filmmakers,” says Snyder. “Each tool is conceived as an element of a unified ecosystem designed to deliver customizable solutions to meet any need or budget. We’re looking forward to the opportunity to present the results to our friends and colleagues in the filmmaking community, and we can’t wait to see how they’re used in the visual storytelling of tomorrow.”
  18. Fellow artists, my name is Qazi, I am a professional Cinematographer, Editor, Colorist in LA. I run a studio called The Post Village. For those who are brand new to filmmaking and not sure what's next. Let's start here. I curated a list of essential PRODUCTION gear you need to get started and become the ultimate content creating machine. Watch the FULL video here: FREE LUT (Teal and Orange) included for those who are interested. Created from scratch by me. I will show you how to properly use it at the end of the video. Check the video description on YouTube. Bless up!
  19. Hey there! I just created a small piece regarding film (photography) I'm looking for critique on this piece. I realized that when I scaled my C4K from the pocket 4k to a UHD timeline, some of my clips towards the end) apparently weren't scaled correctly so a white line pops up on the right side of frame. (Lame because it doesn't show up in premiere's editing windows) Also banding is insane with YT compression so a couple of shots you notice it quite a bit. (Tried to minimize it with grain added) Anyways, thanks for stopping by and drop any tech questions you have below as well!
  20. Hello, I am looking for a used super 16 package with a PL mount. I'm interested in a SR2 or SR3 or an Aaton XTR Prod. If anyone is interested in selling please let me know! Thanks!
  21. OP is the question, although I also am wondering if these drop ceilings in the attached picture work with scissor clamps? I can't tell if the gap/space down the line is just cosmetic or functional, and these pictures are being sent to me.
  22. Im new to the forum and have a long question, but I have read a lot of posts here before so I am turning to you all for help! I bought my first super 8 camera, a Canon 310xl a couple of months ago, and in January, I bought two cartridges of Tri-X reversal to shoot with. I am a college student, so I did not have a chance to shoot until last week, so until then I kept the two carts in the fridge to keep cool. So last week, I finally opened my first box of Tri-X and loaded it into my camera. I notched hack the cart so I could control the built in filter as well! I turned the camera on and pulled the trigger, and the film ran for about 30 frames before the film transport indicator in my viewfinder stopped running, indicating that the film was not moving. So i opened my camera and pulled the cartridge out and the film had snapped! The whole cart gone. So I chalked it up to maybe a faulty cart, so I loaded my second one. And you guessed it, the exact same thing happened! Both my catridges with snapped film. So my question: Why did this happen and what can I do to fix it? I don't know enough about yet to be able to figure out whats causing the film to just break. Did the film get brittle from being in my refrigerator too long? Or is something wrong with my camera, is it too fast? Is something wrong with the takeup hooks? I just don't know. I have called Kodak about getting replacements, but scared that the same thing will happen again. If you may know anything about why my film is breaking after 30 frames I would appreciate your help. Im a college student, I can't afford just buying more film if I will never be able to shoot with it. Thanks!
  23. I'm going to shoot a short silent horror film this fall and I'd love to capture the feel of an old print that's been dragged through Hell and back. My two questions are: what would be the best frame rate to use and how can I get a blown out look like you'd see in a film from the very early 1900's? Should I overexpose the film or ask the lab to mess with the print?
  24. Leica Camera has created a fitting tribute to the world of cinema with the new release of the Leica M10-P “ASC 100 Edition”, celebrating the 100th anniversary of the American Society of Cinematographers. Comprised of a Leica M10-P camera and a Leica Summicron-M 35 f/2 ASPH. lens, the memorable set offers two specially tailored Cine Look modes built into the camera’s software that make it a focused professional tool for cinematographers and filmmakers. The set also includes a Leica Visoflex electronic viewfinder and a Leica M-PL-Mount Adapter that allows the use of almost all PL mount cine lenses available on the market. In collaboration with some of the world’s most influential cinematographers and members of the ASC, Leica has developed the new Cine Look feature, which provides directors an exceptional visual experience. The “ASC Cine Classic” mode simulates a classic, analog 35mm motion-picture film look, while the “ASC Contemporary” mode delivers the current digital style of contemporary movies. Additionally, aspect ratios that are used in cinematography can also be selected from the camera’s menu. Once activated, the selected aspect ratio is displayed as a bright-line frame in Live View mode. The Leica M10-P “ASC 100 Edition” offers cinematographers and directors the freedom to view and assess scenes with any desired lens before filming even begins. Founded in 1919, the American Society of Cinematographers is the world’s longest-standing artistic, technical and professional organization dedicated to the advancement of cinematography. Just like Leica, this extraordinary society has influenced and shaped how people of all cultures see the world for more than 100 years. This limited-edition release is a modern take on Oskar Barnack’s original vision of the “Ur-Leica” prototype camera as an aid to cinematography, now reiterated in the unique design of the Leica M10-P ‘ASC 100 Edition’. Reduced simply to the essentials, blacked-out engravings on its black chrome surface accentuates the camera’s minimalistic feel which is further emphasized with the body leathering, similar to that of the Leica SL. The gold-colored anodized finish of the Leica Summicron-M 35 f/2 ASPH. lens reinterprets the brass lens of the original “Ur-Leica” in a contemporary way. The unique aesthetic of the Leica M10-P “ASC 100 Edition” is also complemented by the ASC logo on the top plate. The combination of the included electronic viewfinder, M-PL-Mount Adapter, Cine Look pre-sets and aspect ratio options enables the use of the camera as a director’s viewfinder, making it an extraordinarily versatile and useful tool for filmmakers. And together with the Leica FOTOS App, location scouting can be made much easier, as results can be shared and discussed immediately with everyone involved in the filming project. The Leica M10-P “ASC 100 Edition” will be available in autumn 2019.
  25. Today, RED Digital Cinema® introduces the DSMC2® Touch 7.0” Ultra-Brite LCD Monitor to its line of innovative camera accessories. The new RED® DSMC2 Touch 7.0” Ultra-Brite LCD Monitor is a robust, optically-bonded touchscreen with Gorilla® Glass that provides the most intuitive way to navigate menus, adjust camera parameters, and review .R3D clips directly out of the camera. It offers a brighter, high-definition viewing experience for recording and viewing footage on DSMC2 camera systems, even in direct sunlight. A 1920x1200 resolution display panel provides 2,200 nits of brightness to overcome viewing difficulties in bright outdoor environments, and the high pixel density (at 323 ppi) and 1200:1 contrast ratio deliver exceptional image quality. The Ultra-Brite display mounts to RED’s DSMC2 BRAIN®, or other 1/4-20 mounting surfaces, and provides a LEMO connection to the camera, making it an ideal monitoring option for gimbals, cranes, and cabled remote viewing. Shooters can use a DSMC2 LEMO Adaptor A in conjunction with the Ultra-Brite display for convenient mounting options away from the DSMC2 camera BRAIN. A demonstration of the new monitor, priced at $3,750 (U.S.), can be seen here: https://youtu.be/sF2PmdoAZoM Link to Ultra-Brite images here.
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