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Found 28 results

  1. Hello everyone, If this has been covered in a previous post please link, I was unable to find much on a few cursory searches. I am requesting advice or suggestions for a good lab who I can send Super 8 cartridges to for processing, telecine, and most importantly good quality post and colour grading. I am based in the UK (London). Normally I rely on someone local who hand-process the film and does all the post for me. I have always been very happy with his work, but I'm interested to see what kind of results I can get from a 'lab'. I am aware of Andec in Berlin ( andecfilm.de ) and the S8 Reversal Lab in the Netherlands ( super8.nl ). Though I have no experience with their service or even if they provide a Grading/Post service. Anyway, I am requesting suggestions, based on experience, of good labs. I'm happy to ship internationally NY, LA etc. for good results. Ideally it would stay EU though. Keep in mind, I am not seeking cinematic quality, for me the decision to use Super8 has always been a point a shoot, in camera, portable film format, so I am not seeking perfection. My main concern is over levels of noise and uneven exposures which I feel might be remedied with a higher quality transfer and greater attention to detail in the grading process (never mind my lack of attention to these details during the filming). I sincerely appreciate your advice, suggestions and shared knowledge. All the best
  2. Hello everyone! I've always noticed that music videos (shot on film) from the early 80's tend to look very different to the ones shot in the late 80's. Early 80's music videos tend to have something different, like a softer look, more flickering and also dust. As I wasn't alive back then, I'm assuming that telecine systems in the early 80's used video camera tubes and late 80's telecine used either better video camera tubes or CCDs. Is this difference due to telecine systems? Maybe type of film used? Early 80's The Human League - Don't You Want Me The Clash - Rock The Casbah New Order - Confusion --- Late 80's New Order - Blue Monday '88 Eurythmics - There Must Be An Angel Rick Astley - Never Gonna Give You Up --- ​
  3. ....my first EVER footage shot on 16mm is coming back me via certified post tomorrow or the day after.... ...the footage has been Telecine'd to HD size and exported as ProRes 422 on a pen drive.....its coming to me clean of timecode marks etc so I can use in the final edit...... My question is......does anyone use Telecine for final piece edit? Obv its to save money on 2k/4k scans that I ask.... .......the final piece will be on social media and at its largest viewed size on a 43" TV at the factory for tourists to watch when the master blowers are not there making glass at the time OBVIOUSLY all I have to do is watch the footage on the mentioned TV and make a decision but I wanted to know if people in my budget situation use Telecine in final edits Tech details Film: Kodak Vision3 500T Camera: Aaton XTR XC Lens: Cooke Varokinetal 9-50mm Format: Standard 16mm Client: Gibraltar Crystal Footage: master glass blowers making pieces at the glassblowing factory to edit into a piece for marketing purposes and for walk-in visitors to watch
  4. Hi All, I was just wondering whether anyone would be able to comment on their experiences with both Cinelab London and iDailies. Ideally, I'm looking for those who have used both companies and would be able to provide some kind of comparison. I understand that the differences between the two will mostly boil down to pricing and service, but I wondered whether their telecines and scans differed at all. (They do both, Cinelab in particular, have a number of option with regards to the type of scan they will give you - HD, 2K Spirit, 4K, etc.) I'd be interested to know also whether people are mainly shooting 16mm or 35mm these days. I am planning to shoot a short up in the North York Moors so if anyone has any suggestions for any labs nearer to Yorkshire that would be great, although I am not sure that there are any left! Thank you all for your help! Cheers, Shahid
  5. As the title says: What is the optimal frame rate for a music video, shot in Europe, with an European band, in an 230V 50hz environment, but with a potential international release? 25? 24? 23,97? Which has the least problems when converting to different broadcast standards?
  6. Hello, Nice meeting all of you. I been shooting a bunch of super8mm this past year, and really enjoying the process. Im just starting out to play with 16mm and will appreciate any answer or help. (no need in-depth or long replies) - I just got a "new" Krasnogorsk K-3 - I was wondering where can I send it to check up/service in Los Angeles Area. Any tricks and tips about that camera? - Where can I get a proper loop for it? - Where is the best telecine lab you guys know in the US? - Super8mm - where can I service my cameras? I got Canon 1014AZ that needing a service as the motor start to get weak. Thank you in advance, Benjo https://vimeo.com/benjoarwas
  7. Hi everyone, I'm writing a piece on the history of colour correction/grading through the ages and was wondering if any of you have been in the business long enough to have first hand experience of grading with film before it went digital? If any of you have any information about who to talk to or know of anywhere that still processes film (preferably in London), please let me know!
  8. Hello colleagues, I'm shooting my first film on 35mm in the of next month and I've been in contact with a lab in Stockholm about the developing and scanning. The quote they sent me, however, has left me a little puzzled - and instead of potentially making a fool out of myself with them I'll take my chances with you guys (ha). They want to charge me for 2 scans - 1k AND 2k. The lines in the quote are the following: Scan 1K onelight 35mm 4perf Scan 2k EDL to dpx Is it really necessary to have a total of two scans? Since skipping the 1K could potentially save us a substantial amount of money I'd just want to make sure. This particular lab is the only place left in Scandinavia for developing 35mm, so I doubt they're trying to rip me off. Thankful for any answers! Best, Kaspar
  9. I'm a student who is about to shoot a 5min 35mm short. The final look we are going for is one with very minimal grain and no noise. This 5207 test video shot by Kodak is a good example of what we are looking for.    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qCxr7YeD0C4   The key thing here is minimal grain and noise. I've been looking into various post houses and the equipment they have and came up with this list:    Fotokem - Spirit  Metro Post - Director Gamma Ray Digital - ScanStation Cinelab - Xena Nolo Digital - Arriscan FilmVideoSolutions - Spirit    I'm not too sure where to go from here. Whats the typical workflow in order to achieve a noise free and (almost) grain free result? Will data scanning instead of telecine help? Is there any post house that is recommended for this sort of thing? And do any of these post houses offer grain management/reduction that can help us achieve the look of that kodak test video?   The scans I've seen from Fotokem seem quite nice in terms of grain and noise but I haven't seen too many examples from others.   https://vimeo.com/174719862   I plan on overexposing by at least a stop to tighten grain but is there any 3rd party software that can help with grain and noise management/reduction after scanning?    Any help is appreciated! 
  10. Hey everyone! So I live in NYC and I've been shooting Super 8 as a fairly serious hobby since last summer. I love it. This forum has been a source of so much info. I've already bought several cameras, shot vacations, field trips, events, etc. Problem obviously is it ain't cheap! And even more of an issue is minimums. Given that I don't normally shoot 4+ rolls at a time, I've been forced to wait for weeks if not months while I slowly shoot more rolls until I meet the minimums. I've gotten developing from Spectra with their film+processing packs for ~$40/roll but that of course doesn't include shipping to/from costs then I have to ship it out for HD telecine unless I do it somewhere in NYC but to be honest, I prefer the pro places as their quality and turnaround is been way better than local in my opinion. Moving on, I've also just bought film locally at B&H/Adorama for ~$38/roll or Du-All for ~$32/roll then sending for processing/scanning at CineLab. That's probably my cheapest method I've found since Spectra scanning is pricey!! Anyways, even with that, I run into the minimum issue with CineLab and Spectra. With $ minimums around 200ft for processing and $150 for HD scanning, that's around 6 or even 8+ rolls before I hit the minimum. I've gotten as low as 6 rolls telecined at CineLab for around $125 which is below their minimum but I guess they just shrugged their shoulders and did it when I mailed the package. All in all, if done right and hitting minimums, I can get a roll bought/processed/scanned for around $70 if not a little less including all the shipping. I know Spectra has their "Rank-A-Roll" packages but those are pretty steep in price in comparison to doing it normally. (~$105/roll) And Yale has its "Reel Deal" packages which are $125/roll. I've also (early on in my tests) gotten 2 rolls developed and scanned as a "Test Roll" from CineLab for around $90 but I'm not sure they'd let me do that every time. So all that to say... you guys have any advice as far as best quality/price balance for low volume Super 8? Does no one else run into this issue? You guys just always shooting 10 rolls at a time? haha. Help a budget filmmaker/enthusiast out!! I know I'm kinda asking for the moon here with film costs these days but the cheaper I can get my methods, the more I will shoot! And I'm always itching to shoot more film! (Also I am very eager to hear more details about Kodak's new S8 packages in the fall. Seems like that would fix my issues if the price is right) Sorry for the wall of text. Slow day at work haha.
  11. I've recently started shooting on 35mm and I have been extremely frustrated by the exorbitant quotes and turnaround times I am getting from post houses around the L.A area for scanning my films. Coming off RED Dragon..once I saw my first scanned 35mm test roll (also had a print made which I viewed on one of my moviolas) I knew I was never going back to digital. Film was everything I always wanted. I am toying with the idea of finding 5-10 independent filmmakers, in the L.A area who are shooting on 16mm and 35mm to come together and invest in a high quality, fast, high resolution scanner (Lasergraphics comes to mind) for us to use 24/7 at no additional costs (except for initial investment). The lasergraphics is a fast scanner (up to 30fps @5k) so we could crunch a lot of footage - fast! When the scanner is not being used by the investors, we could scan for other independent filmmakers, effectively paying ourselves back. There are obviously things to iron out like: -Where is the scanner stored? -Do we operate with a queue system(when investor 1 is done, investor 2 scans..etc) -Who operates the scanner? -Is there a quota limit per week? (If investor 1 has 20,000' of film but investors 2,3,4,5 have 1000' we make logical arrangements so everyone can have their footage scanned. After the one time investment, investors get unlimited access to the scanner for life. Investors sign a fair agreement so investors are protected against overuse, etc. That's it - I had this idea because of the frustration I've been going through lately. If anybody is interested or wants to pitch in other ideas, post here or PM me directly. I have a scanner option but need to discuss with potential investors.
  12. Hi there, Recently I made some very low light tests with a new camera, and when I got the material back from telecine, I noticed a light spill of some sort on the left edge of frame. I framed it in black so it's easier to see. Don't mind the poor quality of the transfer (plus the image is kinda grainy, because it was exposed intentionally under limiited light conditions). Couple of things come to mind. Could it be light spill from the sprockets on the telecine? One other thing is that, the door and viewfinder I was using has a kind of a mirrored double image on the left side which I can see in the viewfinder beyond the black frame. I have other doors that don't have this "problem" (if it is a problem...I really have no idea...). So I was thinking, what if the light of the mirrored image somehow going back through the groundglass? Any opinions would be most appreciated. thanks
  13. Hi my name is Ricky Dominguez form Luna Films in Puerto Rico and we want to transfer all the 16mm material (22,620 ft) that was recorder for a documentary in the 90’s and I want your opinion in what is the best option that you recommend and why. First we have 21,820 ft of negative material and 800 ft of positive from a workprint because the original (negative) material was lost. What should we use to do the transfer, film scanning or telecine, witch one is better and why. What machine would you recommend to do the transfer. What size, 1080, 2K, 3K, 4K and why. Occasionally we will use the same shot as medium shot and then closeup, the documentary will be finish at 1080p so 2K and higher will be better to reframe. We use FCP X so I think ProRes would be the best option but which one 422, 422 HQ, 4444, 4444 XQ What company do you recommend to do the transfer and why. As always the budget is limited so what would be the best price for a good quality film transfer. Thanks for all the help. Ricky Dominguez
  14. Yes, another 16mm question :) I have two 16mm color double-perf Kodachrome prints (less than 400' each) that I've been storing at the Academy archives in Hollywood. These prints from 1965 & 1968 document two world premieres here in Los Angeles and the color & condition of the both rolls are stunning. I don't think they've ever been projected. When we found them, we originally screened them on a flatbed Moviola and thought we had color reversal film. Closer inspection of the film over the light table revealed it was, in fact, Kodachrome. My question is: what is the best way to both archive this & digitize it for use in Final Cut Pro? There is lot of discussion on the forum regarding 2K vs 4K 16mm scans, but I'm presuming this refers to NEGATIVE, not print. Any tips, pointers or advice? Many thanks :)
  15. michel

    POST PRODUCTION

    Dear Friends, i am Michel From india and i would like to SHOT with mini DV and then covert into TELECINE into 16mm / 35mm kodak stock.
  16. Hi All, Wasn't really sure where to post this, let me know if I should move it. I have a "Retro8 Pro" and a "Retro16 Pro" scanners for sale from "Moviestuff.tv" Practically NEW, I transferred 5 rolls of S8 and 2 of 16mm. Still under manufacturer's 1 year warranty until Feb. 2016. I'm selling them because I bought the new one (all in one). These scanners are the best out there, I had a roll of film transferred at three different top notch post houses in LA, none of them came even close to what these little guys can do. Roger from Moviestuff has really done an excellent jobs designing these machines. I'm asking $2800 for each or $5000 for both. Let me know if you're interested, no low ballers please.
  17. Retro16 Pro Scanner from Moviestuff. It's practically NEW, I scanned two or three rolls of film then upgraded to the new one (HD Universal). Asking $2500 OBO or trade for motorcycle of same or higher value. Manufacturer will give a 6 month warranty if sent in to check/refurbish at no additional cost (US only), Shipping is also free to lower 48 states. Roland text/call 213 819 8320
  18. I have a "Retro16 Pro" scanner for sale from "Moviestuff.tv" Practically NEW, I transferred 5 rolls of film, then bought the Universal one. I'm asking $2100 OBO with free shippig to Lower 48 states and 6 month warranty from Roger (manufacturer). Let me know if you're interested. Roland
  19. Hey everybody, On another thread awhile ago I saw somebody looking for advice on how to achieve that "Kodachrome look" when there aren't many reversal options left. There was a great suggestion to try making a print of the negative, and transferring THAT. Has anybody done this, and does anybody have any links to the results? 20 years ago in film school, I remember getting a 16mm work print transferred to VHS (!) and I remember it looked cool, but that was a long time ago and I don't still have it. I would love to see iif this is worth doing, or if it's too much hassle / expense for something that could maybe be achieved just as well or better in a standard telecine with the right colorist, etc. I'm shooting a Super-16 film later this month and I, too, would love that heavily saturated reversal "look". Thanks so much for any advice, Bo Price
  20. As I mentioned in the Super8 thread, I have a long dreamed of project in the works: A feature that will be partially shot on Super8 film. We are shooting all of the 8mm scenes first and will edit and then see where we are at. Never mind the fact that prices for stock have gone up by 50% or more in the last 18 months :angry: there is also the issue of not receiving responses from the labs or scanning facilities I have contacted. I don't want to be rude and mention which ones, but it seems like maybe some just don't care about 8mm at this point because I am receiving replies to my emails inquiries. That would not have happened 2 or 3 years ago. Some of these places are big names and well known here. Maybe I'm just too small-time for them to bother? We intend to shoot on Tri-X, Vision3 200T and a little bit of 50D. Anywhere from 15 to 24 rolls, depending upon how well (or poorly) we do. 24fps of course. Most MOS. There are two sequences with sync sound. The most likely camera used is a Nikon R10, though I am trying to find someone with a Leicina Special or the new Logmar in the NYC area. I am in the process of acquiring an R10 right now and would have to shoot one or two test rolls. 1080p would be the minimum for scanning for the project and frankly 2K might be smarter since I really want to retain that all important film grain. That is so important. I don't want it to turn to mush. We are shooting in the NYC area late September and hope to finish no later than October 5. I would need some immediate turnaround since I have to leave for China on October 18. Getting everything in place ahead of time is important, not just for me but I am sure for whatever lab and scanning house we use. That's the situation. We have an insanely limited budget and certain people involved are trying to get me to switch to shooting this stuff digitally, but it's imperative to me that these portions of the film be shot on film. I do not want to shoot this stuff with a digital camera. The rest of the feature will be digitally captured so dammit, this material which is designed for 8mm needs to be shot on 8mm. But if I can't get answers to my questions or find a place willing to work with me... I will be forced to go digital. :( I'm all ears. Thanks.
  21. Hey everyone, Recently I shot a student film with 16mm Kodak 200t 7213 stock. It recently came back from telecine and it looks much more grainy than the footage I've seen previously online of 7213 or even 7219. A Spirit Data cine was used for the transfer and I got the footage as HD pro res 4:2:2. We rated the film at 200 and underexposed -1 stop. My question is, is this the noise from the telecine or is it just 16mm grain? I attached some screenshots below. Thanks in advance Best Regards Yunus
  22. Hello, I am preparing to scan 610m of 16mm color negative in 2k. The telecine operator offers uncompressed ProRes, DNG, and DPX. I will be editing /grading on a macbook pro that can't run DaVinci. I have graded raw files before (RED and Black Magic), but never a scanned negative. My question is, which format should I ask for? I want to be able to adjust the color and exposure to the same extent I was able to with RED and cinema DNG files. The operator said that these DNG's are not the same as BM DNG's please help!
  23. Hi everybody, So at my school I'm going to have the luck to be the DP of a small short in 35mm. The worflow is this : Shoot 35mm the negative is developped and transfered in both mediocre HD for editing and decent 2K for grading and finishing. I know more or less how contrast works when you get a positive from the negative, that is : shooting the same negative at various EI + the positive give different looks (deeper blacks, more or less contrast in the shadows, less grain, more saturation etc etc) So I wonder how this applies when you scan the negative directly. I'll have a 500T, what if I rate it at 250 ? The guy from the lab told be he scans according to the middle gray chart (if we shoot one) What about things like blacks, whites, contrast, visible grain, saturation ? Thanks guys !
  24. Hello, INFO: 1) I shot some R16mm/S16mm tests and had a telecine at two different labs. The R16 was done at Lab 1 and the S16 at Lab 2 (also a second telecine of the same R16 footage was done at the same lab, Lab 1.) 2) All the stills are shot in the exact same location. Meter: F1.2 and on 7219 3) The S16 is shot at F2 with a 9.5mm Zeiss Super Speed Prime 4) the R16 stills were both shot at F1.3 with a 16mm Zeiss Super Speed Prime. Shots: R16 Lab 1 (Tele 1) R16 Lab 1 (Tele 2) S16 Lab 2 Questions: 1) Why does the S16 image seem to have so much more light than the R16 images when it is actually closed a full stop down (F2 vs F1.3)? (Again the R16 was done at lab 1 and the S16 at lab 2) 2) Why is the S16 image much more green and then the two R16 images so different from one another, (one is redder and the other white, same footage)? How are these choices made at the lab? 3) Finally, based on the meter reading of 1.2 and the 7219, does one process/lab stick out as more accurate as far as exposure, obviously the more light the better. Could lab 1 have under processed? Could lab 2 have over processed? I assume they have the same processing times. But how do I know what I am going to get? needless to say I need some adepts here as this is pretty confusing I appreciate your time thank you
  25. Hi all, I've recently finished shooting a music video on 4-perf 35mm, 5219. I'm about to send the film off for processing/transfer and I'm sort of stuck as to whether I should get an HD telecine or a 2k scan. The price difference given the amount of film I'm working with is not that large of a concern. My lab of choice (the wonderful Video and Film Solutions in Maryland) uses a Spirit for both. Now obviously, as it's a music video, it'll only ever be viewed on computer screens, so I'm sure the difference won't be too drastic between the two, but there are still some factors to consider. First off, a solid amount of the video is shot in a city (Richmond, VA) at night, with only available light, meaning I was basically consistently rating the film at around 2000 ASA, sometimes higher. So grain will definitely be an issue, and on top of that, I plan on pushing a few of the rolls 1 stop. From my previous experience with 2k scans, it seems as if the higher resolution relative to HD makes grain seem even more apparent in scans than it does in telecine, so would the combination of the thin negative, the push, and the 2k scan make the grain way too intense? I understand that "way too intense" is a vague quantifier, so I guess to put it a bit better, would I be better off in terms of keeping the grain at a manageable level (given the negative that I'll be working with) with an HD telecine or a 2k scan? And I guess in a more general sense, what would be the advantages (or disadvantages) of going with 2k in this situation? Also, this may be a stupid question, but just to clarify my understanding, it's definitely possible to maintain the 1:33 aspect ratio with an HD telecine, right? Any time I've previously had HD telecine of 35mm it's been automatically cropped by the lab to conform to a 1920x1080 frame. But theoretically wouldn't it be possible to maintain the full 4-perf frame with no cropping if I specifically instructed the lab and just have bars on the left and right of the frame? The film was framed for and always intended to be presented in that format. Any help is greatly appreciated! Thanks, Dylan
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