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Will Montgomery

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Will Montgomery last won the day on February 5

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About Will Montgomery

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    Producer
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    Dallas, TX
  1. I've always ordered directly from Kodak (800.621.FILM (3456)). If you have an account it's easier but they will accept credit cards...you just have to read off the numbers to them every time you order. Their shipping is fast and cheap. Looks like they have online ordering through the website now as well. https://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/products/product_information/index.htm
  2. The "removing the filter then you have to collimate part may be witchcraft," but the point that a 4008 is what...35 years old and who knows what's been done to it is not witchcraft...always worth checking collimation every few years, especially if the camera is new to you. But if you test it and have no issues then save the money. Checking it should be part of regular service so if it's a new camera to you then service by someone who knows what they're doing is more important than just collimation.
  3. If the internal filter is removed it is a good idea to collimate the lens. Actually, it is always a good idea to have that done. Björn Andersson in Sweden can help you with that. Filmkonsult Svebaco KB - Björn Andersson Vidholmsbackkarna 54 - Box 5136 - 165 72 Hasselby - Sveriges Telephone: +46 (0)838 1074 Email: bjorn.andersson@brevet.nu info@beaulieu-service.com
  4. Yep. Unless you're ok with film chain transfers, costs savings with Super 8 is pretty minimal compared with 16mm and maybe even 35mm if you get stock cheap.
  5. An unsharp mask type plugin may appear to help a little but there's simply no substitute for proper focus. The data is just not there.
  6. My results with the Wolverine were very similar to Daniel's example posted. It almost looks like it was captured at 360dpi and enlarged to 1080. Like I said, it makes otherwise sharp footage look like a Monet painting. If you want to say it does a fine job for the money, I guess maybe that's the case since it's $300...but it would be completely unusable for me in any situation other than simply to know what was on the reel.
  7. Shooting 7222 is like shooting some of the really old Hollywood Movie stocks...if you don't have big lights it can get very grainy. A beautiful grain in my opinion but could be a bit much. Highly recommend testing before a shoot. Movies like Good Night and Good Luck shot in Vision 500T then desaturated in post so keep that in mind. Just plan on having plenty of light; more than you think you may need so you're not shooting wide open on the lens. It's always easy to remove light in post but adding it in just leads to more grain and ugly blacks.
  8. Focus tests I've done on multiple Scoopics seem to be fairly accurate. I'd love to hear your results.
  9. If you're a glutton for punishment you can make it work no doubt. Good luck with that. By the time you add everything on to it the cost and the cumbersome-ness would be crazy. Image can be more or less as steady as a 2c maybe, but not a 3 with registration pin. Not saying its a crappy camera (I have 5) just saying it's not what I would shoot a feature with. Would you really debate that?
  10. You're not going to make a feature with an Eyemo...1 minute at a time... They are great for crash cams and something where you don't want to risk a real 35mm movie camera; and perhaps for home movies if you don't mind changing reels constantly. They are not particularly stable compared to any modern (in the last 40 years) camera but not un-stable either. They give a noticeably improved image over 16mm even with cheap lenses. Here's footage from a wind up Eyemo...1080p transfer. Outer edges are extremely soft due to the lens but the center shows more detail than you'd get from 16mm in my opinion.
  11. Bernie & I go way back. I'll call him, thanks. Very true. But so nice not to have to constantly wind them. I do have a spring drive Eyemo that is as reliable as the day it was built. Also would work as an excellent bludgeoning weapon.
  12. I have several Steve's Cine modified (motorized) Eyemos that are looking for some service love. Since Steve is retired (don't want to bother him) it would be nice to find someone who services them. Might be expensive to send to Deutschland though... One is in pieces and another may just need a fuse for all I know; just don't have the time to sit down with them unfortunately.
  13. So even if you get a scan back that you think doesn't look great because of the age or temperature handling of the film, you might be surprised what a good colorist with film experience can do with the scan. They have tricks you won't find in a YouTube Resolve tutorial.
  14. Great news! So Cinelab is basically a one-stop-shop now for any kind of motion picture film processing, correct? Nice to be able to send everything to one place. Regular 8, Super 8, 16, 35, color reversal, B&W reversal, color negative...Double X B&W negative as well?
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