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Yash Lucid

Where to learn directing?

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Quick Backstory:

As someone who did not have the luxury to study film or even get experience on set even as a coffee-runner, due to an almost non-existent industry in my town (Durban, SA), I always wanted to learn how to film. I did have one resource however, decent internet.

 

So I watched a Lynda.com tutorial, followed Tony Reale's HDSLR 101 series on youtube, constantly watched, commented and discussed topics on Vimeo Video School, as well FilmRiot/Indy Mogul/Cheesycam, and read a book or two.

 

It has all lead to me this point since beginning my journey in 2012:

 

I now want to use my skills gained from web-video directing, corporate video directing, and indie-film directing, to transition into commercial directing. I've moved up north to Johannesburg which is the "LA" of South Africa where I'm offered many opportunities.

 

While I am working my ass off and getting on as many sets as I can and continuously working, I'd like to know if anybody can point me in the right direction to find any Directing tutorials online.

 

Unfortunately, while watching hours of interviews with Tarantino, Nolan and so on are amazingly insightful, they are still far from the basics of what I'm looking for, so if anybody knows of the equivalent Lynda.com tutorial on directing, to be used as another source (i.e., not my only source) of learning, I would appreciate it!

 

Thanks!

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Maybe try the courses on Hollywood Camera Work? the one in blocking is very good and worth the money.

 

http://www.hollywoodcamerawork.com/the-master-course-in-high-end-blocking-and-staging.html

 

Also, I would contact Callacrew or Nautilus or similar agencies to let them know that you are around and want to transition into commercials.

 

Have a good day!

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You really gotta start and getting your hands dirty with a cheap camera before all else. Produce shorts constantly and the process of "learning from your mistakes" is mathematically practical within a smaller amount of time.

 

Once you've fabricated your own experiences, I personally recommend the online content of Shane Hurlbut and the online Masterclass from Werner Herzog.

 

All in all, make sure you have the time and ability to simply practice in general. If you don't apply what you're learning from the recommended resources, you may as well spend your time playing video games or something.

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Yash Im sure you will make it sir... when you are inevitably on that first shoot as director.. don't ever do that making a frame with your hands thing.. or suddenly swish your finger out when you want to cut.. there will be much sniggering and uncomplimentary banter behind your back.. a joke.. but serious too.. :)..

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Yash Im sure you will make it sir... when you are inevitably on that first shoot as director.. don't ever do that making a frame with your hands thing.. or suddenly swish your finger out when you want to cut.. there will be much sniggering and uncomplimentary banter behind your back.. a joke.. but serious too.. :)..

I've never said "action" or "cut" on a set before. It's corny to me.

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I've never said "action" or "cut" on a set before. It's corny to me.

 

Well I think its fine for the dir to say action and cut.. its just that frame with the fingers thing.. this is sort of universally ridiculed :)..

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Maybe try the courses on Hollywood Camera Work? the one in blocking is very good and worth the money.

 

http://www.hollywoodcamerawork.com/the-master-course-in-high-end-blocking-and-staging.html

 

Also, I would contact Callacrew or Nautilus or similar agencies to let them know that you are around and want to transition into commercials.

 

Have a good day!

Yes! I've heard about this, will look into it. Thank you!

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You really gotta start and getting your hands dirty with a cheap camera before all else. Produce shorts constantly and the process of "learning from your mistakes" is mathematically practical within a smaller amount of time.

 

Once you've fabricated your own experiences, I personally recommend the online content of Shane Hurlbut and the online Masterclass from Werner Herzog.

 

All in all, make sure you have the time and ability to simply practice in general. If you don't apply what you're learning from the recommended resources, you may as well spend your time playing video games or something.

100%!

 

I started with a Canon 60D and worked my way up.

 

I've always considered Shane's inner circle but it looked like it was more for DPs than Directors. Will check out the other class as well, thank you!

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41S-Oirq4XL._SX329_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

LINK


__________________




directing-actors-judith-weston_medium.jp

 

LINK

________________

41GpUskG1tL._SX322_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

 

LINK

......

"The 30sec Storyteller" is a great book covering the process from start to finish.
Just take a look at the table of contents.

"Directing Actors" is a great one on the topic with so many depths and insights.

"Making Movies" is the personal process of making 'em by the great Lumet.


Best

Igor

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its just that frame with the fingers thing.. this is sort of universally ridiculed :)..

 

:wacko:

 

n12.jpg

 

Sorry for the Hijack, couldn't miss the opportunity.

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Almost not not quite .. the hands must be much closer together.. and you have to be crouched down a bit.. and short stooped walk is also good .. preferably kicking over a lens box or makeup kit.. coffee etc..

 

Brian.. that photo could just be fellow crew member .. in a moment of astonishment having just see the sound recordist standup.. and possibly dropping his donut..

Edited by Robin R Probyn

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I'd second Directing Actors by Judith Weston - its a really great starting point to get you to think about performance and understanding actors.

 

But other then that its quite difficult to teach and learn directing. Success really comes from practice and experience. Lots of good directors didn't train - e.g Nolan, Garth Jennings, Dougal Wilson, Shane Meadows - it was just practice and trial and error. Starting on small projects and building up. The trick is to try and push yourself with each project, try something new each time.

 

I don't think there are lots of directing tutorial on line because its quite difficult to demonstrate it in the same way you can with say lighting. So you can watch interviews and presentations where directors discuss their process - but you don't see the way the operate on set. But also directing is really quite personal and everyone has quite different approaches. When I started directing I relied too much on other peoples advice and trying to copy filmmakers I liked. It took awhile for me to relax and let my own personality come through in my work. Thats the important thing as a director - deciding what it is you want to say and how your going to express that. Thats a personal thing and won't be found in tutorials.

 

I teach filmmaking and I've found that you can teach the craft skills, the language of production, getting coverage and production management and workflow in a straight forward way. But teaching directing is less about being prescriptive but more about creating an environment for students to become inspired, try things out, make mistakes and mostly become effectively critical.

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I'd second Directing Actors by Judith Weston - its a really great starting point to get you to think about performance and understanding actors.

 

But other then that its quite difficult to teach and learn directing. Success really comes from practice and experience. Lots of good directors didn't train - e.g Nolan, Garth Jennings, Dougal Wilson, Shane Meadows - it was just practice and trial and error. Starting on small projects and building up. The trick is to try and push yourself with each project, try something new each time.

 

I don't think there are lots of directing tutorial on line because its quite difficult to demonstrate it in the same way you can with say lighting. So you can watch interviews and presentations where directors discuss their process - but you don't see the way the operate on set. But also directing is really quite personal and everyone has quite different approaches. When I started directing I relied too much on other peoples advice and trying to copy filmmakers I liked. It took awhile for me to relax and let my own personality come through in my work. Thats the important thing as a director - deciding what it is you want to say and how your going to express that. Thats a personal thing and won't be found in tutorials.

 

I teach filmmaking and I've found that you can teach the craft skills, the language of production, getting coverage and production management and workflow in a straight forward way. But teaching directing is less about being prescriptive but more about creating an environment for students to become inspired, try things out, make mistakes and mostly become effectively critical.

Lovely post, thank you! ^_^

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Regarding "the rules", like don't do the "making a frame with your hands thing.". Ignore that stuff, do whatever works for you its your set, we shouldn't be setting off fearing crew ridicule.

 

On set the Director is usually presenting a version of themselves. I don't normally need to do hand frame thing, but I might do it when describing a camera move or demonstrating the shot to an actor. And that depends; some actors want to know about the technical side (what the frame is etc..) and others don't care less. There is no "wrong" behaviour for a director as long as you respectful to cast and crew and work safely. Everything else is about creating a mood and sometimes even conforming to director stereotypes might help.

 

Although we don't always need to do the more formal calling turn over, speed, mark it, action - esp if your self shooting. A lot of actors like it, the rituals can make them more comfortable. I also find the word "action" cheesy but I use it because thats what the actors are used too. But if I'm doing a doco interview, I would never call action, I probably would also roll in secret and tape over the record light. Horses for courses really

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I'm 99% self taught and have made 5 feature films. I never read any books. I did go to "film school" but learned very little, which is typical from the four year degree programs. They are more about sitting in class, taking tests, and writing papers, etc.

 

R,

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Nobody can teach you how to direct. And there is no right or wrong way to do it. I can tell you all the ways not to do it from experiences, but not how to.

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If there are no wrong ways then how can you also tell someone how not to do something?

 

 

I've directed a handful of commercials where someone from the agency said something to an actor that I would describe as something not to do without saying how to. I remember one guy telling an actor to make sure not to sweat because the shirt we picked will show every drop. That was not helpful.

 

Those books mentioned above are great. Read them and absorb what you feel applies to your sensibilities and discard what doesn't. But, like some others have said, trying to copy another director's approach likely won't work for most people. Figuring out how to get what you like up on the screen will develop with experience.

 

That said, it's a scary thing when something is clearly not working and all eyes are on you to fix it, but you don't know how. Unfortunatly, that will happen at some point no matter how many books you've read, or advice you've gotten.

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If there are no wrong ways then how can you also tell someone how not to do something?

 

That's what I meant but wasn't very clear - only in retrospect.

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A bigger problem is the on-going issue of "everyone" wanting to be a director. Other positions on film sets are now actually going begging and getting harder to fill. Open your door in LA and yell, I need a director! And 500 will come running.

 

R,

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