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Lucas Fletcher

Twin Peaks

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Hello.

 

Has anyone been watching the new Twin Peaks, photographed by Peter Deming? I believe it was shot on the Amira, although were parts captured on 35? Many scenes have a very rough, almost documentary style with little stylisation, although others are completely the opposite.

 

It also sees a lot of VFX work and integration which is a first for David Lynch.

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Yes - its great maybe I'll notice the lighting on the second or third watch but the first pass was full immersion into the dream.

 

Def going to get the wife one of those talking tree blob stick things at Christmas time

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Have any other users had a chance to check it out?

 

It's interesting aesthetically to me because it doesn't resemble any other of the high budget TV shows on the air right now, mainly in the sense it's not at all filmic and doesn't try to be. Very flat, very digital. Would hope Peter Deming will talk a little about how he approached it soon.

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The parts on 35 you talk about were simply scenes pulled from Fire Walk With Me or the original Twin Peaks. Other than that, it does look very flat like you say, I'm not sure many people will comment here, there's not much to say imo.

 

Twin Peaks to me, watching it for the first time on Netflix, has a lovely look and it is jarring to switch to digital, but Twin Peaks The Return looks fairly pedestrian, seeing a lot of the stuff on Netflix right now like Dear White People, or Glow (especially with the 2:00 AR), or other shows like The Leftovers or Fargo, I'd say it's one of the least cinematic shows around, I'd argue that actually it very much looks like some of the middle of the road stuff we otherwise see on TV.

 

It's probably sounding like I'm ripping into it, but imo The Return is the best Twin Peaks has ever been, and I don't think the visuals matter much here. I'm bummed Lynch didn't go for film, he said he would for this, had a change of heart.

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Hello, I've been wondering then if you know why Fotokem Lab would be credited each week for dailies and digital intermediates.

Perhaps because Fotokem, like all the remaining labs, have diversified into the digital world, and are producing dailies from original camera files, and misusing the term Digital Intermediate to refer to final color correction.

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The parts on 35 you talk about were simply scenes pulled from Fire Walk With Me or the original Twin Peaks. Other than that, it does look very flat like you say, I'm not sure many people will comment here, there's not much to say imo.

 

Twin Peaks to me, watching it for the first time on Netflix, has a lovely look and it is jarring to switch to digital, but Twin Peaks The Return looks fairly pedestrian, seeing a lot of the stuff on Netflix right now like Dear White People, or Glow (especially with the 2:00 AR), or other shows like The Leftovers or Fargo, I'd say it's one of the least cinematic shows around, I'd argue that actually it very much looks like some of the middle of the road stuff we otherwise see on TV.

 

It's probably sounding like I'm ripping into it, but imo The Return is the best Twin Peaks has ever been, and I don't think the visuals matter much here. I'm bummed Lynch didn't go for film, he said he would for this, had a change of heart.

 

 

That's a shame. I was sort of looking forward to seeing it and I'm not sure I'm as interested anymore.

It's funny I quite liked the idea of seeing Dunkirk too but I don't think I will see that either now.

 

Ah well.

 

Freya

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That's a shame. I was sort of looking forward to seeing it and I'm not sure I'm as interested anymore.

It's funny I quite liked the idea of seeing Dunkirk too but I don't think I will see that either now.

 

Ah well.

 

Freya

Its well worth your effort (and effort is the correct term). Just to see how far Lynch has pushed television - its not like anything you've seen on TV before at all.

 

In terms of the visuals its very mixed and think thats intentional - you have some scenes that are very flat and static, almost mundane visually. Combined with many shots held much longer then comfortable. But then you have other shots that are full on Lynch abstract that are as bold visually as anything you will have seen in film or television. Episode 8 is both infuriating and genius in equal measure.

 

More me its just a joy to see something each week thats going to be surprise - although I'm loosing patience with the whole Dougie Jones storyline (but thats probably the intention)

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That's a shame. I was sort of looking forward to seeing it and I'm not sure I'm as interested anymore.

It's funny I quite liked the idea of seeing Dunkirk too but I don't think I will see that either now.

 

Ah well.

 

Freya

 

So you'd avoid watching a film that doesn't have flashy cinematography? It's a great show. Lynch is pushing the envelope massively.

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So you'd avoid watching a film that doesn't have flashy cinematography? It's a great show. Lynch is pushing the envelope massively.

It has the most flashy cinematography of any TV I've seen. If you define "flashy" as liberal use of Strobes. You literally couldn't want for any more flashing lights.

 

https://media.giphy.com/media/xUA7b0pEURKGMjnjbi/giphy.gif

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What do forum members think he uses for strobes? Lightning strikes? They seem to be blue (daylight balanced). But there are no rolling shutter artifacts, which I see with other strobe effects on the Alexa. Is there an affordable way to get a similar effect that has the same slow decay?

 

I don't think the show looks too cheap or overly digital. If anything, the lack of mixed color temperature, lack of stylized grading, and presence of high key low contrast lighting with a bit of lens diffusion looks like older tv. I prefer how film looks so I prefer the look of the original show, but I think the cinematography suits the story. It wouldn't feel so strange if it didn't look so normal.

 

The style overall is a bit cheesy–from lighting to acting to vfx. Somehow it really works, although I could do without the flashbacks.

Edited by M Joel W

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I've used Atomic strobes and Papparazzi strobes on the Alexa with almost no artifacts (sometimes the rolling shutter effect would drift away and then return after some time.) There are now LED strobes that don't seem to create rolling shutter artifacts.

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I've also had good results with the Papparazzi light. Atomic 3000 strobes can work as well, but you need to make sure you have DMX control so that you can control the flash duration.

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Thanks, I just checked out this comparison video and the Atomic 3000 has more rolling shutter artifacts it seems (could it just be the DMX controller the used?), but it's very affordable:

 

 

Do you need a special DMX controller for lightning strikes? Even though the Atomic 3000 is 3000w cans you power it off a 15 amp circuit? (Or a Honda inverter generator?) Thanks again!

Edited by M Joel W

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The only problem with lengthening the strobe pulse duration is then it doesn't really look like a strobe, as in freezing the action just on the part of the subject illuminated by the strobe.

For simulating longer-duration lighting phenomena such as lightning flashes a LED strobe is fine, but if you want a razor-sharp "snapshot" effect, film is still pretty much the only game in town.

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Is the F55 the only "high end" or any end for that matter.. global shutter (as in part of the sensor).. digital camera ..?

 

It seems now that things that would have, in the recent past, be considered huge problems with sackings and re shoots are totally accepted.. e.g. banding on stills flashes and very obvious strobing on slo mo shots.. Ive seen both in feature films and what looks like big budget commercials and music video,s..

 

Personally I think its fine and audiences don't all start screaming and tearing their hair out..esp strobing in slo mo is also a look now.. but I remember in the past on much smaller shoots such things would be considered a big problem.. and heads would fall probably or at least hung in shame..

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Is the F55 the only "high end" or any end for that matter.. global shutter (as in part of the sensor).. digital camera ..?

 

 

Not the only one, no. The Alexa Studio has one too (courtesy of it's mirror shutter), and the F65 uses a similar mechanical rotary shutter (only without a mirror to allow for an optical viewfinder like the Arri).

 

The Panavision Genesis and Sony F35 also have a global shutter thanks to their CCD sensor, but they're pretty niche these days.

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So you'd avoid watching a film that doesn't have flashy cinematography? It's a great show. Lynch is pushing the envelope massively.

 

That's a bit of a wild assumption as I really like "Inland Empire" a lot and have watched it many times. Having said that I didn't think it worked well on the big screen but there we are. I also really like the cinematography in Inland Empire but I don't think anyone would describe that as flashy.

 

I don't have to do much to avoid watching films either at the moment as I have very poor access to the internet.

 

I'm interested in anything that David Lynch does and if I get the opportunity some time I am sure I will see it.

I'm probably just not going to seek it out right now.

 

Freya

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Not the only one, no. The Alexa Studio has one too (courtesy of it's mirror shutter), and the F65 uses a similar mechanical rotary shutter (only without a mirror to allow for an optical viewfinder like the Arri).

 

The Panavision Genesis and Sony F35 also have a global shutter thanks to their CCD sensor, but they're pretty niche these days.

 

 

Thanks Mark.. I should have said besides the CCD cameras,or those with actual shutters (which I guess technically would be classed as rolling shutter).. but actually with the circuitry built into the sensor like the F55.. hence I read its lower ISO 1250 than the f5 2000.. as the GS stuff takes up real estate on the sensor..dont know if Sony officially say this though..

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