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Jinuk Lee

Vintage Look

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Hello!

I am currently doing some research for a music video student project I am DP-ing in a couple weeks. The story is about an old Italian musician who struggles to find his place in the modern world. I think a warm vintage look (like 8mm film) would best serve the project.

That being said, should I light using tungsten fixtures and try to create the warmth practically and set CT to Daylight, or try to create the look in post like Amelie and use an orange tint while coloring? FYI, the interior's color palette is mainly red, and I am planning to shoot on a Panasonic GH5 with V-Log, 10bit with a 4:2:2 chroma subsampling. Cheers!

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Unfortunately, I have no experience with film and I don't want to attempt to shoot on it without some base knowledge on the process. I don't think I have enough time to really learn and experiment with it for this project. I would have loved to try shooting on Super 8, given the proper resources.

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Unfortunately, I have no experience with film and I don't want to attempt to shoot on it without some base knowledge on the process. I don't think I have enough time to really learn and experiment with it for this project. I would have loved to try shooting on Super 8, given the proper resources.

 

I understand, you have decided against Super 8 for this.

 

For anyone else interested, these are the steps:

 

1) Find a Super 8 camera,

2) Buy film here: http://store.kodak.com/store/kodak/en_US/DisplayCategoryListPage/ThemeID.4792758000/categoryID.70237500

(Get to the student discount site from there)

3) Stick the cartridge inside the camera.

4) Point it at whatever you want to shoot.

5) Shoot.

6) Take the cartridge to Spectra if you live in Los Angeles.

 

5626 Vineland Ave

North Hollywood, CA 91601

 

7) Ask for processing and scanning.

 

There, you've just shot actual film and your project will stand out from others that try to fake the look.

 

To fine tune the above, you'll only need to learn about built-in filters, and built-in light meters and you'll have the basics down.

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Got the Arri Tungsten Kit, some Dedos, Zip Lights, bunch of LEDs, HMIs, Kino Flo Divas, Mole 2ks, Softboxes, Chinaballs,

Nothing fancy really.

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Yeah avoid LEDs and Kinos if going for a vintage look. Kinos didn't start getting big till around the 90's, and LEDs... well everyone posting here was alive when they exploded onto sets.

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You can get a warm look with modern fixtures. And Kinos have been used in a lot of period movies -- look at "Master and Commander".

 

"Amelie" actually did most of the warmth in camera, with warming filters outdoors and warm lighting indoors.

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You can also add a 1/2 soft fx or glimmer filter to add a vintage look. Shooting on old glass will help your look as well. Maybe something like the Helios 44-2 58mm at f2

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Thank you for all the advice. Also wondering if anybody knows a poor man's way of recreating the spotlight and shaft of light like in the opening shot of Kendrick Lamar's Humble music video. Link to video below:

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The sun?

 

If you need to recreate something like that, you need something that produces - well - a big beam of light. A theatrical followspot will do that, and some of those are big Xenon or HMIs, so they're quite powerful.

 

A purist would recommend something like a Molebeam, but that's a big-ticket item. That's the only way of getting quite such a confined beam, other than a followspot or other big profile/ellipsoidal.

 

Many PARs will do things like that. Affordable PARs exist in the form of something like an ETC Source Four PAR, which is a theatrical lighting device and therefore very affordable, but at 650W of tungsten they're not powerful enough to do what's being done in that picture under most circumstances. Arri's M-series are often presented as an alternative to PARs, but really they're a better PAR. Interchangeable lenses would be picked for the narrowest possible beam.

 

And yes, you could do it with a fresnel, but you'd need a big one, becuase a fresnel is not a very optically efficient device.

 

Molebeam:

 

b895737e49008bd273e5645a59dddc71.jpg

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You can cluster a group of Source-4 Lekos together with narrow lenses -- as long as the beams are parallel, it will look like one big source being broken up as if passing through window mullions or tree branches, etc. You won't get a single shadow on the ground though.

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You could also use a large HMI, like a 6K or 9K so, and shoot that into a 4x4 Mirror from the ground, though you'd have a square source in the window and not a ciruclar one. Same could be done with multiple JoLekos or what-have you, all hitting into the same mirror.

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Adrian, I did that a year ago in a theatre, with a 4K HMI PAR and a 4x4 mirror from a balcony and I definitely could have used more output that day, so I can only agree with your unit size recommendations. Maybe an M40 could do it, but probably nothing smaller...

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I think a lot depends on the throw you need relative to everything else. M40 isn't a bad place to start (as it's a new-er reflector). Or you could go crazy with a Xenon. I wonder if a 2.5K Xenon would be enough.

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